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dividend capture and covered call writing

Combining Dividend Capture with Covered Call Writing: Pros and Cons

Why not use covered call writing with only dividend-bearing stocks to generate three income streams; option premium, share appreciation to the (out-of-the-money) call  strike plus the dividend itself? This article will explore the pros and cons of this approach to covered call writing.   Strategy theory We screen for stocks that have ex-dividend  dates  (also […]

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broker levels of trading approval

Writing Naked Calls on Poorly-Performing Stocks

Selling covered calls and cash-secured puts are the main strategies highlighted in our BCI community. Much of the information disseminated on the Blue Collar site, books and DVDs is based on member feedback, inquiries and comments. In September 2017, Marc sent me an email question about selling naked (without owning the underlying security before selling […]

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bear market strategies

Inverse Exchange-Traded Funds versus Shorting Stocks

In bear markets, one of the tools we can benefit from with our covered call writing and put-selling strategies is inverse exchange-traded funds (ETFs). An inverse ETF is also known as a short ETF or a bear ETF. These securities are constructed to return the exact opposite performance of a certain benchmark or index. Many […]

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Russell Rebalancing Day: A Cause for Concern?

Covered call writers and put-sellers are aware of the value to avoiding risky events like earnings announcements. An impending FDA announcement regarding the efficacy of a new drug being tested is another example. This article will define and explore the potential concerns of trading on or though Russell Rebalancing Day.   What is Russell Rebalancing Day? […]

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covered call writing calculations

Mitigating Losses After a Disappointing Earnings Pre-Announcement

A critical BCI rule for covered call writing is never to sell an option if there is an upcoming earnings report prior to contract expiration. Earnings reports are risky events we want to avoid. From time-to-time a company will pre-announce earnings especially if there will be a negative story to tell its shareholders when the […]

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Covered call writing and technical analysis

Special 1-Time Cash Dividends for Stocks with Improving Technicals

Covered call writing and put-selling candidates must pass a series of fundamental, technical and common-sense screens in order to be considered eligible for our portfolios. In early January 2017, one of our members, Jim W, asked about using Ford Motor Corp. (F), a stock that does not pass our BCI screens but has several positive […]

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actively-managed mutual funds versus Index Funds

Indexing: A Key Component to Successful Long-Term Investing

In my book, Stock Investing for Students, I develop a long-term investment plan to achieve financial independence and an early retirement. The plan is initiated by using broad market index funds. This article will highlight the reasons why I favor passively-managed mutual funds to their actively-managed counterparts. First, some definitions.   Definitions Index fund: A type […]

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Bernie Madoff

Psychology of Stock and Option Investing: Ten Years of Observations

QUESTIONS FOR COVERED CALL WRITERS AND PUT-SELLERS: Why do retail investors buy high and sell low? Why do we sell our winners and keep our losers? Why do many of us feel that the market is rigged in favor of Wall Street insiders? Boy am I starting off on the wrong foot with this article! I’ll […]

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calculating Delta for covered call writing

Using Delta to Determine the Amount of Risk in Our Option-Selling Positions

Covered call writing and selling cash-secured puts are low-risk option-selling strategies used to generate monthly cash flow. Low-risk does not mean no risk so how can we measure the degree of risk we are undertaking? Let’s first all agree that any strategy that aspires to generate higher than a risk-free return (Treasuries, for example) will incur […]

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option liquidity showing Volume and Open Interest

Open Interest: How it’s Calculated and Why it’s Important

When selling call and put options, the liquidity of these securities must be evaluated to determine their eligibility. There are two measures of investor interest in options, Vol(ume) and Open Interest (OI). Vol represents the number of times a particular contract is bought or sold in a particular day. Open interest, on the other hand, […]

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